That Gap Between Thoughts

collectivehistory:

Today in History: June 28, 1950 –  During the Korean War South Korean military and police summarily executed at least 100,000 suspected North Korean sympathizers in an event known as the Bodo League Massacre

The Bodo League massacre was a massacre and war crime against communists and suspected sympathizers that occurred in the summer of 1950 during the Korean War.

In 1950, just before the outbreak of the Korean War, the first president of South Korea, Syngman Rhee, had about 30,000 alleged communists imprisoned and about 300,000 suspected sympathizers or his political opponents enrolled in an official “re-education” movement known as the Bodo League on the pretext of protecting them from execution. 

On June 25,1950, the Korean War began when Kim Il-Sung’s communist army attacked from the North.  According to Kim Mansik, who was a military police superior officer, President Syngman Rhee ordered the execution of people related to either the Bodo League or the South Korean Workers Party two days later.

The first massacre was started one day later in Hoengseong, Gangwon-do on June 28th. Retreating South Korean forces and anti communist groups executed the alleged-communist prisoners, along with many of the Bodo League members.

Sources: 1, 2, 3

(via collectivehistory-deactivated20)

moshita:

These grave markers — pressed up against either side of an imposing wall, with a pair of clasped hands reaching over the wall’s top — date to a time in Dutch history when Catholic and Protestant graves were strictly segregated. A Catholic and a Protestant married couple, separated in death, arranged for this unique workaround in order to rejoin one another
until death do us reunite

moshita:

These grave markers — pressed up against either side of an imposing wall, with a pair of clasped hands reaching over the wall’s top — date to a time in Dutch history when Catholic and Protestant graves were strictly segregated. A Catholic and a Protestant married couple, separated in death, arranged for this unique workaround in order to rejoin one another

until death do us reunite

natgeofound:

A group of scarabs from the Scarabaeid family, July 1929.Photograph by Edwin L. Wisherd, National Geographic

natgeofound:

A group of scarabs from the Scarabaeid family, July 1929.
Photograph by Edwin L. Wisherd, National Geographic